Make your own free website on Tripod.com
Wall Street Journal

National Report on Business International Sports Arts + Leisure Technology Focus + Books Commentary Health Travel Features Classifieds Circulation
HOME
top level navigation

subjects
GLOBEfund.com GLOBEcareers.com GLOBEtechnology.com ChaptersGLOBE.com ROBmagazine.com

bottom

index
NATIONAL
News
National Issues Forum

REPORT ON BUSINESS
News
Managing
Enterprise
Money & Markets
Smart Numbers
Appointments
Annual Reports
Biographies

INTERNATIONAL
News
The Globe Abroad
SPORTS
News
Hockey
Football
Basketball
Baseball
Other
Biographies

ARTS & LEISURE
News
Fashion & Design
Art
Theatre
Music
Books
Film
TV News
TV Listings
Broadcast Week

TECHNOLOGY
FOCUS & BOOKS
Book news
Book reviews

COMMENTARY
Send letter to editor
HEALTH
TRAVEL
FEATURES
Column One
Facts & Arguments
Lives Lived
Wax & Wane
Essay
Social Studies
Editorial Cartoon Century of the
   Millennium

SCIENCE
CLASSIFIEDS
Births & Deaths
Automotive
Real estate rentals
Real estate sales
National personals
Online personals
Services &
  Merchandise
Place an Ad

CUSTOMER SERVICE
Subscribe to the paper
  + Sunday NY Times
  + Wall St. Journal
Gift Subscription
Intl. Subscription
General Inquiry
Change of Address
Vacation Suspension
Weekday Lineup
Special Reports

STORY SEARCH
A GLOBE HISTORY
MAKE US HOME
LINK TO US
CONTACT US
ADVERTISE

bottom
  [an error occurred while processing this directive]
The Globe and Mail
SEARCH

Employees treasure health benefits, poll finds

Wednesday, February 24, 1999

Canadian Press

Montreal -- Canadian employees covered by group health plans would be willing to pay higher premiums to maintain benefits, a survey made public yesterday suggests.

The poll also says plan members rate the public-health-care system as very good but are split on how to fund it.

The survey, conducted Nov. 25-Dec. 10 by the Angus Reid Group for the pharmaceutical company Hoechst Marion Roussel Canada, had a margin of error of 2.5 percentage points 19 times out of 20.

It found that 81 per cent of 1,508 plan members surveyed were willing to pay more to maintain complete health coverage, either through higher premiums or by paying a higher portion of costs.

A majority -- 55 per cent -- said they would be willing to pay an average $99 a year more to cover all prescription medications. About a quarter of the respondents were not willing to pay more and 19 per cent did not know.

Nearly three-quarters of those surveyed -- 73 per cent -- said they believe their medical benefits meet their needs.

The survey also found 85 per cent of respondents deem the public-health-care system good, very good or excellent.

However, on funding of the system, 57 per cent endorsed a combination of taxes and user fees while 41 per cent favoured maintaining a totally public system.

A statement by Hoechst Marion Roussel said 21 million Canadians rely on private-employee-benefit plans. Private-health-care expeditures amounted to more than $22.7-billion in 1996, almost a third of total health-care expenditures in Canada.

It is the second year the drug maker has commissioned such a study.


STORY SEARCH
This search allows you to look for stories that have appeared on The Globe and Mail Web site in the last seven days. Explanation and other options available.